FAQ General 1
What is Osteoathritis?

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It is a degenerative joint disease that causes deterioration of cartilage between bones. It can be caused by aging, genetics, obesity, and joint injuries from sports, work, or accidents.

98% of the knee joints replaced in the UK are because of osteoarthritis.at

What tests will confirm the diagnosis of osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis is often visible on X-rays. Cartilage loss is indicated if the normal space between the bones is narrowed, if there is an abnormal increase in bone density, or if bony projections or erosions are evident. A blood test is often taken to rule out rheumatoid arthritis.

Mr Moss will conduct an examination of your joint and will ask you to describe the pain. He will record your medical history, often asking you a series of questions about injuries, infections, ailments you have experienced, and any medications you are taking.

From this information and examination, Mr Moss will choose the most appropriate treatment option for you.

How do I know if I require knee surgery?

Commonly patients experience pain and swelling in the knee and find that everyday activities are uncomfortable. Walking may be restricted and sleep may be interrupted. Patients may notice instability or locking of the knee and occasionally a grinding sensation.

Though non-surgical treatments are always considered initially, if using medication and a can aren’t delivering enough relief, you need to be referred to a consultant orthopaedic surgeon by your GP before you can be considered for surgery.

Why do so many people need their joints replaced?

The most common reason is osteoarthritis which causes a patient to experience aching, stiffness, and eventual loss of mobility within the knee joint. Inflammation may or may not be present. The pain may be severe at times, followed by periods of relative relief. It often worsens after extensive use of the knee and is more likely to occur at night than in the morning. Stiffness tends to follow periods of inactivity, such as sleep or sitting and can be eased by stretching and exercise. Pain also seems to increase in humid weather. As the disease progresses, the pain may occur even when the joint is at rest and can keep the sufferer awake at night.